Wavves

Sold Out: Wavves

Twin Peaks, SWMRS

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

This event is 18 and over

STANDING ONLY; 2 DRINK MIN; NO CAMERAS/RECORDING

Wavves
Wavves
Straight from the dungeons of L.A., Wavves are releasing Afraid Of Heights, their fourth album and first on the Mom And Pop label. Now a duo consisting of guitarist Nathan Williams and bassist Stephen Pope, they sound bigger, brasher, and shockingly professional than ever on Afraid Of Heights that positions the band to take their rightful place amongst the pop-punk gods.You know the story by now. Bored dude in his parents' tool shed-turned-room with no insulation and a record stuck to a hole in the wall to keep the mice out turns on a four-track recorder, fucks around and ends up with two of the oddest, noisiest and downright catchy albums of recent memory. Those two records (the eponymous Wavves the eponyymous Wavvves) were winningly, messily chaotic—grand on a small scale, but not necessarily world-beaters. Which is why when Williams, then solo, linked up with erstwhile Jay Reatard sidemen Stephen Pope (bass) and Billy Hayes (drums) and busted the door down with the stunner that was King Of The Beach, a pop-punk blackout for the DeLonge and Deleuze crowd. After the smoke of King Of The Beach had cleared, Williams and Pope released the Life Sux EP, a testament to the crushing powers of rock n' roll and also ennui. The product of more than a year of writing and recording, Afraid Of Heights expands the Wavves sound while remaining true to the band's original vision—it was created with absolutely no label involvement, a specter that nearly derailed King Of The Beach. Working with producer John Hill (known for his work with M.I.A. and Santigold, as well as with hip-hop acts such as Nas and the Wu-Tang Clan), the band found a willing party in creating what they felt was the truest expression of what they wanted. As for the Afraid Of Heights sessions themselves, Williams paid for them out-of-pocket, explaining his reasoning with, "In doing so, I had no one to answer to. We recorded the songs how and when we wanted without anybody interfering, and that's how it's supposed to be."

Lyrically, Williams took the focus less off of his own melancholy and out into the world, with songs that dealt with crooked preachers ("Sail To The Sun"), relationships ("Dog") and killing cops ("Cop"). Even when he reaches outside his own damaged psyche, Williams is still making Wavves songs, saying, "The general theme of the record is depression and anxiety, being death-obsessed and paranoid of impending doom. I feel like the narration is almost schizophrenic if you listen front to back; every word is important, even the constant contradictions and lack of self-worth. That's all a part of this record—questioning everything not because I'm curious, but because I'm paranoid." That paranoia manifests itself on many of the album's best tracks, such as the spacey drones and bummazoid vibes of the Weezer-referencing, getting-drunk-because-you-can't-bring-yourself-to-care-vibey "Afraid Of Heights," or the string-aided "I Can't Dream," which rounds the record out with the optimistic, "I can finally sleep," before subverting itself with, "But I can't dream." With their biggest and boldest-sounding record yet, Wavves might have finally come into their own, a fully-realized punk rock force in both sound and vision.
Twin Peaks
Twin Peaks
Don't bother asking Twin Peaks about the deeper meaning of their band name. They simply thought it sounded cool, which explains why their second album Wild Onion isn't as spooky or surreal as David Lynch's short-lived TV show. It's more like a modern day Nuggets, with Ty Segall, Black Lips and Thee Oh Sees curating instead of Lenny Kaye. Not literally, of course. But the spirit of those garage demigods is alive and well alongside subtle nods to everything from the Pixies and Tame Impala to the godfathers of guitar-guided pop music, the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and the Beach Boys.

If combining the influence of so many classic artists seems like a lofty goal for a group of 20 year olds, just remember that Twin Peaks' core quartet—frontman Cadien Lake James, guitarist Clay Frankel, bassist Jack Dolan and drummer Connor Brodner—has roots that reach back to elementary school. And while their friendships were forged long ago, James also learned the ins and outs of the local Chicago scene with his last project: Teenage Dream, a minimal-yet-mean duo with his older brother Hal.

"We played our first show when I was a freshman," says Cadien, "and of the three people who came out, one was Alex White of White Mystery. She loved it. Alex has taught me a lot about being business smart and taking things slow, about being grateful and expressing thanks where due, and about being a gracious musician. The generosity of all the bands in the scene out here is pretty amazing."

The only problem? Hal was asked to join the Smith Westerns, and since Cadien didn't want to go the solo route, he found the perfect outlet in Twin Peaks. Having quickly cut their debut LP, 2013's Sunken, so they could sell it on tour, the band was excited to spend more time developing Wild Onion, a record that reveals a level of maturity beyond all the amp-singeing solos, ragtag rhythms and dizzying voices of three distinct singer-songwriters. Unlike acts who let their egos get in the way, Cadien, Clay and Jack share the spotlight and play to one another's strengths as Connor keeps things moving with a steady beat.

So while it's hard to tell who's screaming what sometimes, the album's overall vibe couldn't be more cohesive, whether it's expressed through sun-kissed psych ("Mirror of Time," "Strange World"), crowd-riling choruses ("Making Breakfast," "Good Lovin'") or hooks that take just seconds to sink in ("Flavor," "I Found a New Way," "Strawberry Smoothie"). Step back for a minute and you'll also notice that everyone's facing the cold, hard realities of life head-on, whether it's relationships, the death of a family member, or getting used to the fact that three-fourths of the band (Cadien, Jack and Connor) left a school they loved (Evergreen State College) to pursue the crushed barriers, rushed stages and tireless recording sessions of Twin Peaks fulltime.

"The album deals with a lot of insecurities that arise when you're growing up," explains Cadien, "It's about adopting them and being vulnerable to let out the tunes. It ain't ideal, but it's sublime."

Or as Jack adds when asked about a song he wrote (the rise above anthem "Fade Away"), "It's about looking at life and smashing it in the face until you break your hand. I hope you play this during your most epic of battles on this world."
SWMRS
SWMRS
SWIMMERS draw on an eclectic mix of influences ranging from the Beach Boys to the Ramones to create their own brand of Rock and Roll, fondly known as “Beach Pop”. Formed in Oakland, California roughly in 2004 by then pint-sized brothers Max and Cole Becker with best friend Joseph Armstrong, SWIMMERS first appeared on stage with best friend and bass player Sebastian Mueller in 2014. SWIMMERS would like you to know that they are really really (really) fun. They would also like you to know that if you don't believe them you should probably have a listen.
Venue Information:
Bimbo's 365 Club
1025 Columbus Ave
San Francisco, CA, 94133
http://www.bimbos365club.com